FINDING AID

AUBURN UNIVERSITY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & ARCHIVES


Guide to the Annie Laurie Morgan Papers, RG 136


Listed by: Dieter C. Ullrich
Date: October 2003

Date Span:
1970-1996

Size:
2.25 cubic feet; 90 items.

Number of Boxes:
2 document box; 1 legal document box; and 1 record center box.

Historical or Biographical Sketch:
Annie Laurie Morgan was born in Birmingham, Alalama, the middle child of five. She attended school in Birmingham for twelve years then attended Montevallo College until she graduated in 1944. After graduation she worked at Dr. Tom Spies - Nutrition Clinic located in Birmingham's Hillman Hospital, which was later incorporated into the University of Alabama Medical School. While working there she married a medical student named Philander Dean Morgan, an Auburn graduate, who went on to finish the Alabama Medical School surgical residency program. Four children ensued as well as a thirty-five year career as a surgeon in Vero Beach, Florida. Her writing career began with articles appearing in local newspapers and magazines. Eventually this led to publication in national periodicals. First book, Sunward I've Climbed, which dealt with World War II, was published in 1994 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Allied D-Day invasion of Normandy. Later it was published in France and subsequently put on tape for the blind by the Seattle Public Library.

Scope and Content:
Contains the manuscript materials, printed articles, research notes, correspondence, and other associated of Annie Laurie Morgan. Included are extensive correspondence and notes created in the writing of the novel entitled at various times, "Yvette", "Shorn Lamb", and "Sunward I've Climbed". Other notes concern "Sasha and the P-47", "A Regathering Of Eagles" and the notes from her study of the French language and receipts which document the expenses incurred in the writing of "Yvette".


Item list:
Accession Number:96-026
Box 1


Item list:
Accession Number:96-088
Box 1


Item list:
Accession Number:96-088
Box 1

Box 2

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