2:54 PM, September 13, 2013

The Use of Historical Analogies to Make Sense of Novel Events (832 B.C. - 2012)

The Use of Historical Analogies to Make Sense of Novel Events contains 4 parts: (1) Speeches, (2) Meetings, (3) Newspapers, and (4) Statements. The data consist of Excel data files with multiple spreadsheets, and Word and PDF documentation files which represent the various sources (speeches, articles, books, meetings notes) from which the data were collected. Book sources are not included in this release, but are referenced. Part 1 (Speeches) contains Excel data files and corresponding documentation files by historical speakers, such as Winston Churchill, President Barack Obama, and Thucydides' Brasidas and Nicias. Part 2 (Meetings) contains Excel data files and corresponding documentation files (transcripts) by historical meetings, such as the Watergate affair, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Persian Gulf War, and the Iraq War. Part 3 (Newspapers) contains one Excel data file for each event: the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the terrorist assault on Mumbai, India in November, 2008, and the demonstrations in Cairo's Tahrir Square (starting in January 2011, which aimed to overthrow Egyptian President Mubarak); these Excel files have corresponding folders with documentation files that were compiled from various newspaper/online news article sources. Part 4 (Statements) contains one Excel data file, which corresponds to a book source of Osama bin Laden statements.

This dataset is available through the ICPSR (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research) database which provides search and browsing access to abstracts and data sets in the world's largest archive of computerized social science data. Search or browse title of study, principal investigator, words in abstract, or study number. Browse major research categories..  Auburn University students, faculty, and staff only may create an account that will allow access to the membership-only data.

Please contact Barbara Bishop at bishoba@auburn.edu or (334) 844-1690 if you need more information concerning ICPSR .

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